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LIBRARY : RESOURCES: Training Materials

Tools such as training materials, handbooks, policy development toolkits, and a list of resources for survivors.
01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Agency Culture

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

Module 7 begins by offering a set of definitions for culture. It describes culture as: the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution or organization. Elements of organizational culture include: beliefs, values, and norms. Factors which influence organizational culture include: history (of an organization), hiring practices, promotional practices, leadership and agency ethics, public opinion, staff dynamics, inmate dynamics, and disciplinary practices.

 

The culture of an organization can either create an atmosphere of safety or of fear. Culture can support or obstruct investigations into abuse.  Among the cultural values of most correctional facilities is a “code of silence” which impedes thorough investigation into allegations of abuse.  It is imperative to understand the culture in which an investigation takes place.

 There are three key steps involved in changing the culture of an organization.  These include being aware of the current organizational culture, determining how the culture of the institution should be, and deciding to change organizational behavior in order to foster a culture committed to safety, and respect for staff and juveniles alike.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Human Resource Issues

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

Module 16 is concerned with discipline and/or termination of corrections staff involved in cases of sexual assault. There are a range of concerns associated with personnel issues.  Terminating an employee is not a simple process. There are a variety of legal and other considerations to take into account.  If a staff member is labor union member, the situation is even more complex. Employees have rights of due process in disciplinary cases. It is important to be proactive in preventing these events before they occur, and limiting liability if they do. It is vital to maintain up-to-date personnel files in case allegations do occur.  These can be referenced in the event of an investigation. It is imperative to maintain a clear set of policies regarding staff conduct. Many correctional facilities maintain policies regarding employee conduct when they are off duty as well as on.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Investigating Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

This module is concerned with investigating cases of sexual abuse.  Before investigations even begin however, it is imperative to have a clearly defined zero tolerance policy for staff sexual misconduct as well as a sound investigative policy. This learning unit covers foundations of successful investigations, and explains why some investigations fail.  Appropriate investigative techniques are laid out, as are factors to take into consideration during the investigative process. Of particular relevance are Garrity rights which protect public employees from being compelled to incriminate themselves during investigatory interviews conducted by their employers.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Legal Liability

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

This module deals with liability as it concerns sexual assault of juveniles in correctional facilities. There are four types of liability municipal, official, individual, and personal. It is important to note that corrections officials are personally liable for staff misconduct.  They can be held liable for failure to train, and supervise staff in a responsible manner.  They can also be held liable if they fail to investigate allegations of sexual misconduct. If corrections staff are deemed by a court to be “deliberately indifferent” to inmate vulnerability, they are held legally liable.  This lesson looks at a number of court cases, and legal precedents that have come to define the terms and limits of liability in juvenile correction facilities.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Management and Operational Practices

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

Management and operational practices are important because they have a direct influence on conduct and misconduct as it occurs in institutional settings. The application of uniform practices and procedures affect attitudes, and behaviors of juveniles and staff. Important aspects of successful application of managerial and operational practices include clearly defined expectations, mandatory reporting (of incidents), comprehensive investigations of any and all allegations, and proficient training of staff and juveniles alike.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Managing Vulnerable Youth in Custody

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

When working with youth, it is important to understand that juveniles have different communications styles, levels of maturity, and emotional needs. Youth who may be particularly vulnerable to assault may have been previously victimized, have limited experience with institutionalization, be developmentally disabled,  mentally ill, gay/transgendered, have limited language ability, or be hearing impaired. Staff should know the juveniles who they are responsible for, and be aware of their level of social development, and potential vulnerabilities.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Medical and Mental Health Care

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

In this module, common reactions to sexual abuse, medical and public health repercussions and mandatory reporting statues are covered.  Adolescents are generally more vulnerable to physiological reactions to stress than adults.  Thus, their response to trauma will be distinct.  Three primary modes of response to trauma are emotional, cognitive and behavioral.  All staff should be trained in trauma response, and be adept at recognizing signs of trauma.

Physical trauma is another important issue of concern in cases of sexual assault.  It is imperative to engage medical and mental health care providers under such circumstances. There is potential for impact on public health in the form of public exposure to HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Therefore any youth involved in a sexual assault should be examined by a health care provider.

 The requirements of mandatory reporting statutes compel responsible adult parties to inform appropriate authorities in the event of an assault. Statues may vary from state to state.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Policy Development

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

During this module, the composition of effective policy will be considered.  Emphasis on decisions related to the design and implementation of effective policy are given consideration. It is essential to maintain a written policy that implements PREA guidelines. Such a policy should be comprehensive.  Institutional procedures will follow from these policy guidelines.  Staff and juvenile residents must be trained in, and be made aware of all policy guidelines. In order to maintain effective and up to date policies, consistent evaluation and revision is necessary. 

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: PREA Overview

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

Module 2 involves an over-view of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003.  The lesson will underline the function of PREA, acquaint participants with the major sections of the law, address challenges to implementation, and look at the present situation with regard to PREA standards.  Of particular relevance is understanding PREA as it concerns juvenile offenders.  The prevalence of sexual assault in juvenile facilities is highlighted by means of examining a survey youth offenders concerning sexual violence at juvenile facilities. Data from juvenile and adult facilities is compared. The findings and recommendations of an institutional review panel, as well as the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission are presented. Suggestions for maintaining compliance with PREA standards are presented.

01 Jan 2010

Addressing Sexual Abuse of Youth in Custody Curriculum: Prosecuting Sexual Assault on Youth in Custody

Authors: NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape

Module 15 discusses building cases against defendants accused of sexual assault. Child sexual abuse cases are difficult to prosecute for a variety of reasons, especially when the accuser has a record of delinquency.  Issues of credibility and a lack of physical evidence make such cases problematic form a prosecutor’s point of view. Prosecutors need to have reliable evidence to prove their cases. The lesson concludes with a group discussion on PREA standards and practices.

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